Archives for posts with tag: clay

yarn bowl common goods

Doesn’t every single knitter already have a “yarn bowl”? So there is no need to make more, right?

Photo lifted from Common Goods.

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All will be kept safely in this jar.

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Seven inches tall. 60 dollars.

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Just two covered jars drying in a sunny studio space at District Clay Center.

or two, or maybe three. Instead of a vase, you need this little plant holder. There may be a better name; I don’t know it. I know the little spiky think is called a florist’s ‘frog.’

I have a few of them for around 20 dollars each.

These two matching (more or less…) pourers look like milk and will handle milk or other liquids just fine. I really worked on shaping the spout on the pot. Usually I have attached one.

Fourteen and twenty dollars respectively.

This a big, heavy bowl taking up all the space on the table right now.  It made me think of the ‘healthcare’ initiative dreamed up by the Republicans. That’s right — it’s still empty.

In a matte white glaze and others brushed on. It’s twelve inches across. Seventy-five dollars.

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This is “earth print bowl” because it looks as if it could be a weather map of the whole world at one time, including the molten core. It has multiple glazes on an altered surface.

For sale tomorrow at the Upshur Street Art and Craft market for $32.

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“We drink from wells we did not dig. We warm by fires we did not kindle.”

You get it — be grateful for the things that have come your way that you had nothing to do with.

Can you add lines to this prayer? I have more in my list, but want to extend this motif further. Send me a line in this pattern and this rhythm: approximately eight words, strong verbs, referring to a necessity of life that we mostly enjoy because of the efforts of others.

Thank you. Thank you.

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I use this tool more and more to roll a fluted edge. Do you know what it is?

 

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The Unitarian Universalist tribe has adopted the outstandingly simple and ancient symbol of a flame burning in a chalice. The big Sunday services include an awesome birthday cake-sized vessel, already lit, carried up the center aisle by a certified, card-carrying worship associate, but each task-centered meeting might begin with the lighting of a small chalice too. (The marvelous Hally A. carries a tiny candle holder and matches in her purse for her meeting needs.)

Thus I see the need for small, personal-sized chalices, for sacred moments, whether you are convening a meeting or not, so I have begun a series of small almond-shaped bowls like these here, in various colors. Some have no handles, but the one above has a rough unglazed pedestal foot and loop handles, also unglazed. (That’s my favorite of the tests, so I’ll make more like that.)

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I use them by filling the bowl with rice or dried beans, and setting a standard candle atop that — safe, simple, edible.

These photos are not so good; it’s hard to convey a glowing flame in the little pot, and I’m no photographer anyway.