Archives for category: glazed

 

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While there are still bears.

 

 

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All will be kept safely in this jar.

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Seven inches tall. 60 dollars.

I’m not sold on the “pop-up” term, but the Pottery Barn store in Bethesda (4750 Bethesda Avenue) kindly allows space for some local potters this weekend. Saturday 10 to 8, Sunday 10 to 6.

Hope to see you there.

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Three stacking cups, red interiors. 70 dollars.

My plate from 2017 on the left. Peter Voulkos’ from 1956 on the right. Go figure.

The Voulkos show is at the Renwick through August.

Set of three cups that stack in a satisfying way. Pinnell’s red glaze on the inside, shino glaze outside.

All three for fifty dollars.

This a big, heavy bowl taking up all the space on the table right now.  It made me think of the ‘healthcare’ initiative dreamed up by the Republicans. That’s right — it’s still empty.

In a matte white glaze and others brushed on. It’s twelve inches across. Seventy-five dollars.

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It’s a “basket” because it has such a humongous (bamboo) handle, which I bought years ago, and moved around on my shelf about a thousand times. I finally made a pot to fit it.

Glazed in Malcolm’s shino with patches of other glazes brushed on.

Thirty-seven dollars.

 

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Pottery Show and Sale
Saturday and Sunday, 3-4 December
 
Lisa Swanson and Carol Herwig
3928 Illinois Avenue NW (my home)
Washington, DC 20011
Saturday: noon to 4 pm
Sunday: 1 pm to 4 pm
Come see and touch. Everything is locally made in Washington, DC.
Watershed Clayworks  202 368 7427

Earlier this month, potter friends Carolyn and Holly and I drove down to Floyd, Virginia, for the open studios of the 16 Hands potters, looking for inspiration. We visited the studios of eight potters (do the math) plus a a few of their invited artist friends.

This piece is by Elisa Di Feo, who works with her potter partner in a fantastic little place. This cup got to me after I walked away a few times. The blue underglaze crayon scratches are childish, but the fine etched lines are very grown up. A fine edge separates matte and shiny surfaces, both white.

Floyd is worth the trip for the rolling Blue Ridge mountain landscape, the steady sounds of local music, the fertile creativity with clay.

An industrial accident. Just kidding.